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Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
, including defense, which accounts for 20% of the budget. but defense is not really seem to be on the table. in terms of widely discussed solutions or strategies. instead, we confront sequestration, a thoroughly bad idea for getting your defense budget or any other budget -- unless we take action, we could face a fiscal crisis that forces cuts to our military priorities, at deep and arbitrary cuts that are not coherent nor prioritized. the question is, can we, and how do we achieve savings? to improve our fiscal outlook will meeting and national security needs. to " admiral mullen again, he said that the pentagon budget was basically double in the last decade. in a doubling we have lost the ability to prioritize, to make hard decisions, to do tough analysis, to make trades. we also need a review of our defense strategy that makes it sure that we are preparing for the threats and risks of the 21st century, not those of the past. the foundation has funded two efforts along these lines to help advance the best ideas for improving our defense strategy. earlier this year, we find it a project by
for defense of democracy. they are hosting a forum called "dictators and dissidents." we'll take you live to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution
defense foundation. hi, mark. >> alisyn, good to be on with you. alisyn: nice to have you. what is your theory first why the president decided to wade into this michigan battle, by the way two years ago this was happening in wisconsin, the president said that is wisconsin issue, meaning let the state decide? >> well in barack obama's autobiography he said i owe these unions. when they call i return their phone calls. that paid off well for him politically. the numbers you mentioned leading up to this question are just the tip of the iceberg what organized labor spends in politics. we estimate and sources verify this, they're spending up to a billion dollars in politics. a president benefited in 2008 and 2012 from literally hundreds of millions of dollars that union officials spend that come out of the general treasury, this is not hard dollars which are voluntary, the pac money. this is get out to vote drives, registration to vote drives. all the reasons touted why barack obama won, that is what he is defending here. the union's ability to compel workers to pay fees as condition of empl
public policy defense. every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs, get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotia
. >> host: so for 2013, we're talking about a total of $109 billion in cuts. the non-defense part of that, discretionary spending makes up about eight eight billion. -- 38 billion. non-defense mandatory is 16 billion. can you explain the difference? >> guest: the mandatory has to do with entitlement programs that are beneficiaries or committed to receiving by law and discretionary spending is where congress has an annual appropriation and that has a lot more flexibility year to year which to cut and which to raise. >> host: so if this happens, let's just begin with what's not on the table. what is exempted from sequestration when it comes to domestic spending? >> guest: well, there's a list of civilian, military pay, veterans benefits, a lot of the what would be called social welfare programs, like the food stamps or snap program. women, infant children. there's retirement, social security, medicaid is exempt. there is also federal salaries in terms of their general schedule brackets can not be affected. >> host: so there is a lot of cuts that would go through if sequestration happens but
to try to fix these problems on revenues, on social security, on medicare, on spending, on defense. and there are going to be different opinions about how we do it. and the truth is, there are going to be really hard choices, and people are not going to be able to all, um, have everything they want as we work as a country to try to dig ourselves out of a fiscal hole. so i'm actually not at all surprised, um, that people are concerned and worried about the choices as we're just trying to figure them out, but i am disappointed that when people are come anything good faith to try to have a real policy discussion about how to do it, that we're not able to. so that, i think, is going to be the kinds of challenges we have as we try to do what the campaign is doing, which is create a big table where we can have that discussion. i think senator portman was incredibly generous to say he looks forward to meeting with his constituents, and i would now like to invite him -- if you're willing to, senator -- to come up and can talk about some of the policies you wanted to talk about. [applause]
the issue of same-sex marriage with the prop eight ban in your state as well as the defense of marriage act on the federal level. do you think the days of same-sex marriage being not recognized, unrecognized as a civil right, are coming to an end? >> i think the supreme court will make the decision. prior to this election, every vote has only been it's only made it through by a legislator, not the vote of the people. in california, the people voted it down. we'll see from the supreme court. >> how do you see it? >> marriage equality is part of america's future. we saw that in state after state in the last election. the supreme court will take up the issue, and i hope that they understand as most of us do that this is part of our future. marriage equality and the equal treatment of people who have made this decision is part of what america is all about. >> final point, senator durbin. susan rice. will she be the president's secretary of state nominee and could she get confirmed in the senate at this point? >> i can't say that because the president has not told me what his decision will be. t
are the biggest part of our spending problem. defense has to be on the table. everything has to be on table. you have to begin this any dpoesh yags by agrees there are knoll going to be any preconditions. even's going to be on the table. you have to also agree nothing will be decided until everything is decided. you also have to agree everything will be done in confidence and bhoofrd behind closed doors. it's extraordinarily difficult when you try to do it. it looks like the campaign is continuing. that's where we are today. we did social security totally plievt behind closed doors. >> so you think the way they're doing it is just wrong. >> i don't think they'll ever get this this way. they're jousting each other. each side is repeating its campaign talking points. you need to have a serious confidenti confidential, substantial negotiation by top levels of both parties. >> you are a political animal. looking at this, this situation, what is your gut? who's going to win? >> i don't know. who we ought to be talking about is not who's going to win but how can the country win? look. in the short ter
entitlements tochb table because entitlements are the biggest part of our spending problem. defense has to be on the table. everything has to be on the table. you have to begin this negotiation by agreeing that they're not going to be any preconditions. everything's going to be on the table, you ought to also have an agreement that nothing will be decided until everything is decided. you ought to also have an agreement that it will be done in confidence and behind closed doors. because it makes it exthe rec d extraordinary difficult when you try to do it -- we did social security totally privately behind closed doors. >> so you think the way it's being done by the white house and the republicans is wrong? >> i don't think they'll ever get there doing it this way, they're just jousting with each other and each side is repeating its campaign talking points. you need to have a serious, confidential substantial negotiation by the top levels of both parties. >> you are a political animal, looking at this, the situation, what is your gut? who's going to win? >> i don't know. what we ought to
with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to in terms of getting an accurate rocket, in terms of getting heat shielding, and in terms of making a nuclear war head signal enough to fit on the end of that missile. but the real danger is what it may do with this technology in terms of giving it over to other nations. >> chris lawrence, thank you. >>> john berman with other stories making news. >>> the united states officially recognizing syria's opposition coalition as the representative of the syrian people. it's just a show of support. it is does not mean america will arm rebel forces. president obama talked about why the decision was made right now. >> the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough. reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, that we consider them the legitimate representative of the syrian people in the asass regime. >>> hugo chavez, recovering from six hours of surgery in cuba this morning. the fourth cancer-related o
was president. significant cuts in defense and also significant human services can you tell us. >> katie, let me ask you, before you respond to what governor dean is saying. there is logic to what howard dean is saying. i don't happen to agree with it. but i know where he's coming from. katie, let me ask you this -- katie can't hear me. we'll wait for her to get back hooked in. howard, what about the notion that i'm posing tonight -- i've said this a few times -- republicans better be careful. they're not going down your road and the democrats aren't going down your road. you have middle class tax cuts for the democrats and it sometimes sounds to me as an old reagan conservative that the republicans better watch themselves because sometimes it sounds like they are kind of defending rich people. that's their whole mantra, just defending rich people. and i think that's not where they should be. >> i would agree. if i were politically advising the republicans, which i'm certainly not, i think tom colts was right from oklahoma. they ought to get out of the way. there wouldn't be as much deficit redu
act. we have the national defense authorization act. all of these things have to be done by the end of the year and he's canceling days of business. so it is a bizarre situation right now. we have -- we came in last night. 6:30. we had one vote to approve the journal. very significant. we're in session all day today. we have one vote. it is a procedural vote. and then we're out of session as of 1:00 tomorrow. >> stephanie: that's a little -- that's a little counterintuitive. we have so much to do. let's work less. good luck. do you have hope for -- better hope for the new congress in the new year? >> i do. again, i think the mood is changing and i think the new members who are coming in are -- were elected in a different environment with a different mandate, if you can call it a mandate. they were elected to get something done. >> stephanie: yep. >> the 84 or 85 or 86 who are leaving, good riddance! >> stephanie: nicely said, sir. all right, representative john yarmuth, thank you sir. >> i love
and social security. we borrowed to do two wars, infrastructure, homeland security, defense, everything, culture, big bird, the whole works, we borrowed $3.6 billion a day? we don't we were know what $1 trillion is. you say the big bang theory of the universe, the planets and the sun, spinning off, that happened 13 billion years ago and that isn't close to a trillion and we owe $16 trillion those babies. have a drink. wake up! >>neil: good words, senator, thank you. >>guest: take care my friend. >>neil: senator simpson, he knows the match and so does kentucky senator rand paul who argues that, look, you can race to get a deal done but if it is a bad deal, maybe to that point, senator, a deal weighted on tax hikes, you would not be to that and it would cause more harm than good. >>guest: i have to say my kids saw you as have hero and they thought maybe your mom method you were special. >>neil: pile on, pile on the italian anchor. that is a genuine reflection of who i am. >>guest: i am sure your mom thinks you are special. >>neil: you think what isn't special the way they are going about
not to defect to turkey or jordan and who are still willing to fly against the new air defense weapons the opposition had. so the meaning here isn't, oh, scuds are terrible. the meaning is, assad is getting increasingly desperate and even though the chemical weapons seem to be on the back burner now i would still watch that space. megyn: we don't want to address that problem when they're on the front burner, ralph peters. >> no. megyn: thanks. always great to get your perspective. >> thanks, megyn. megyn: a popular reality show got slapped by a big lawsuit from one of its former stars. who claims that the important parts of the hit tv series, "storage wars", are all rigged and fake. we'll debate in "kelly's court" next. >>> members of a labor union in philadelphia wanted to make sure their complaints were heard loud and clear. they came up with a day of doing so and reaction is not what they expected. >> your community is trying for jobs, participation and fair wages. [baby crying] but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with u
munitions. a senior u.s. official and top diplomats tell cnn the u.s. and its allies are using defense contractors to train syrian rebels on how to secure chemical weapons stockpiles. our sources say the training's taking place in jordan and turkey. they tell us the syrian rebels are being trained on how to monitor and secure stockpiles but also on handling the weapons sites and materials. how dicey is it to train syrian rebels on handling the materials? >> i think on the one hand, these may be individuals that are going to be the first oneses into some of these sites, and they have to know what safety precautions to take. otherwise, they're not going to want to go in and they also have to know what to look for. >> reporter: leonard specter is a chemical weapons expert with the monterey institute. he says western intelligence is confidence the syrians have mustard gas, which is a blistering agent. they may also have a nerve agent that specter says can break down your muscle control and kill you like bug spray kills an insect. if these materials are mishandled -- >> probably what will h
, pass a massive defense bill yesterday worth $631,000,000,000. the national defense authridesation act imposes new sanctions against iran changes the policy for american citizens and restores the pentagon bio fuels program. the defense bill has always had bi-partisan support. this time, it passed unanimously 98 to zero. we will be right back. who watch our show to be able to come away armed with facts and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. but it's also about telling them that you're put on this planet for something more! i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action for themselves. as a human being that's really important. this is not just a spectator sport. [ music ] >> broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv this is "the bill press show". >> president obama tells bloomberg news one more time, there will be no deal unless tax rates go up for the wealthiest of americans. what do you say? hello, everybody.
be at risk if we go over the fiscal cliff. i can tell you that all of the defense contractors very nervous about what they're seeing in washington right now. >> put down the cell phone and the breakfast brooit burrito. huron, south dakota has approved one of the toughest bans on distracted driving in the country that includes, listen to this, a ban on eating while you are driving. if anyone is caught texting and driving, they will be fined $100. you can get a ticket if you're eating lunch, reading the paper or putting on your make-up in the mirror. i'm in trouble. make-up and eating. >> head to our blog, cnn.com/early start for the top stories. we're right back. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven's home security gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark busi
to the "politico playbook." defense cuts have been a bit of a sticking point. we don't talk about them much. it's been all about taxes. you say some republicans now open to looking at trimming the defense budget. >> well, they are. and this is another part of this republican reboot we're seeing just in the last week. three big issues where the republican party is changing before our eyes. immigration, they want to talk about president obama about it, work with him on it, gay marriage. the house leaders who asked for one of the supreme court cases, silent since the court took it. now defense cuts. more and more republicans are saying that they're willing to talk about it. >> good. >> saying it junt cuts their credibility on other spending issues. >> good. >> it's the pentagon. >> there is so much waste in the pentagon. it's one of the few bureaucracies you can't audit. it is impossible. whether you're talking to peter peterson, dave walker, they tell you, you can't audit the pentagon. it is impossible. >> and yet there are some republicans you say who are willing to go out on a ledge and say it'
in the world market? >> bill, do you know where i heard that exact same explanation, defense? i heard it when wall street wanted deregulation. "we have to be competitive in the entire global economy. let's deregulate wall street so we can compete internationally." i don't believe that for a second. look, the issue is we live in a country where millions of people really have not had the opportunity to learn about the dynamics of what goes on in american society. major, major issues literally, get very, very little discussion. so the bottom line for the fcc has got to be, "how do we create a situation in which the american people are hearing a diverse range of ideas so that our public world has the kind of debate that it needs?" >> but what about the argument that people make that the internet, the thriving of the internet, let a billion opinions bloom diminishes the tyranny of monopoly? >> let me respond to that in two ways. "a," the internet is enormously important. it is growing. but the bottom line is that most people today still get their information from television and from radio. >> 74%,
politicians blast out to anyone who winds up on their mailing list. pathetic defense. >>> up next, the fiscal cliff. president obama's in campaign mode while republicans are considering, well, considering. can the president pull off a historic victory? maybe. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. ♪ [ male announcer ] with free package pickup from the u.s. postal service the holidays are easy. visit usps.com. pay, print, and have it picked up for free before december 20h for delivery in time for the holidays. you can even give us special instructions on where to find it. free package pickup. from the u.s. postal service. because it's nice to have an extra pair of hands around for the holidays. because it's nice to have an extra pair of hands around of washington about the future of medicare and social security. anncr: but you deserve straight talk about the options on the... table and what they mean for you and your family. ancr: aarp is cutting through all the political spin. because for our 37 million members, only one word counts. get the facts at earnedasay.org. let's keep
, and the defense of marriage act which the obama administration now refuses to defend in court. and so as soon as president clinton was out of office, the tax code he had rewritten to be more progressive was immediately rewritten by this guy to be less progressive. when george w. bush rewrote the clinton tack rates tax rates to be friendlier to the rich, some democrat in the house and in the senate voted for the new tax rates. there was no lasting clintonian to hold against the bush tax cuts. some democrats voted for the bush tax rates. so nothing of reaganism, whatever that was, lived after the reagan presidency and nothing of clintonism lived after the clinton's presidency. what, then, of gingrichism, newt gingrich was in congress during all three of the presidencies we've considered here. reagan, the first bush, and clinton. during the republican years when republicans started drifting towards agreements to raise taxes, newt gingrich attacked those republicans. he wasn't willing to take on president reagan head on but in 1984 he actually called senator bob dole, quote, the tax collector for
to be on defense this way when they're already having so many other challenges. >> we should bring up the dynamics in michigan that are different. snyder had said all along he was not going to do this, and then to do -- you know, and whereas in wisconsin people thought, well, maybe recalling. they were more sort of divided about whether or not the recall was the right answer to what had happened. i think that's going to be a much easier message to push in michigan, and then you have two things. labor is fully ready to be there as long as they need to be there. they've got their same apparatus and ground game that they had from the elections still in place, so i don't think they're going anywhere, and they'll be looking at measures or ways that they can bring a citizens sort of protest to this and see if they can find a way to repeal it. >> getting past the unions, which was key in wisconsin, they lost in wisconsin wishes but when you get your neighbors out, you get the people who like the nurses and teachers that aren't in the unions, people, you know, family members. a lot of family members are a
, on reforming those systems to save medicare and medicaid, social security, cutting defense, reforming the taxes, then do not meet -- if he doesn't want to meet halfway, but i've got to tell you, i am heartened with what i saw in the president's tone yesterday. i loved hearing him tell a group of americans yesterday, hey, we're going to get this thing done. i feel good about it. i love that he agreed to sit down with john boehner one on one. richard, you've done negotiations on all levels. i really liked the tone the president was sending. and by the way, i felt like charles krauthammer did a couple of days ago. because the president seemed to be saying -- and you've said it, too, along with geithner -- we won. the other side's going to cave. the president's changing his tone, and i think that is great not only for the american people, i think it's great for the president. >> i think you're right. there's a sense that people have once again remembered the basic rule of negotiation. in a funny sort of way, you've got to help the guy you're negotiating with because you need a partner to succeed. y
in tomorrow. members will consider whether to send negotiators to meet with the senate on defense department programs for next year. off the floor of negotiations continuing over the fiscal clef. that's a combination of tax increases and spending cuts set to begin in january. live coverage of the house tomorrow at 2:00 eastern on c- span. earlier today, the pew center on the states held a discussion about the 2012 election and this upcoming panel focused on voter registration and on-line registration compared to using paper and mail. this is about one hour. the next discussion is a topic near and dear to our heart -- it's our voter registration system and how desperately in need to upgrade. we have been working with officials in many states to help harness technology to improve voter registration and i'm really looking forward to hearing from these folks up here today. with that, let me introduce the moderator of this panel discussion -- he's my colleague here, a good friend and great dinner companion on the many trips we've had talking with election officials. he's also one of the most pass
. >> and he's defensive about it. and he's stubborn about it. there's something much deeper going on. he understands football, rex ryan, so he knows objectively that mark sanchez is not getting the job done and hasn't for the last couple of years. so it defies credibility that you wouldn't at least give another guy a shot. or when you did give another guy a shot in greg mcelroy, he won the game for you, so maybe give him a shot this week. >> i can understand saying tim tebow's not the quarterback that i want to go with, but you had mcelroy who played on a national championship team, he grew up with his father being a coach for the dallas cowboys. he gets it. he came in off the bench last week, won the game, and you're not dressing him the next week? it's like rex ryan wants to be fired. >> it's selfish also because you have to say as a coach, i want to give these other guys a chance to win. and we'll start mark, but we're going to go with the guy that can help win this game because everybody's practicing hard and we want to win which makes it even more curious because rex is a good coach
have a nor'easter our defenses are so far down that person's immune system is susceptible and thirdly, we come with less than 30 days to the -- this just has to be done. i feel like i have to be houdini to accomplish this so we are going to do this and so, secretary at look forward to your work and your help as we get to our colleagues as well. thank you mr. chairman. >> i will note this senator menendez will chair a subcommittee field hearing in new jersey next monday december december 10 on super storm sandy. senator toomey. >> thank you mr. chairman and thank you mr. secretary for joining us. i would like to understand better and aspects of the actuarial review. the question arises from the interest-rate assumptions and the interest-rate interest rate environment that is used to determine the prevailing view about the value of the mutual mortgage insurance fund and the family fund. more specifically, you observe on page eight of your testimony the fact the worst shape the fund is to simplify that and you walk through the mechanisms by which a lower interest rates while good for the
can use the royal we as we're pregnant. that's okay. but in her defense -- >> stephanie: yes? >> there probably are family members who were momentarily confused. if history is -- path to prologue. they went oh my god what? oh! just you. it is the end times. jehovah god. michele bachmann called and congratulated him and then she went over and yelled at marcus. >> the day is at hand. we're in the last days. your jehovah god. >> maybe marcus can carry the next five. >> stephanie: is it me or -- she talks like a toddler. please don't talk to me. >> don't pinch my cheeks. >> who's the lilja hova god with the tummy tum tum? >> peekaboo! >> i see all. i can't play peekaboo. i'm all-knowing too. you can't hide the keys. i know which hand it is in. i created your hands. >> stephanie: can't play peekaboo. >> oh, you're a cutesy. >> stephanie: cranky old john mccain wants to be on the committee to yell questions at susan rice. >> hey i wonder why. maybe it's because he's out of committees because he's terme
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)